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For years, Black writers have tried to demonstrate and explain how it is to be a black person in America. How is it that most are still left behind? Why there is systemic racism still rampant in a country that abolished slavery more than  150 years ago? One of those writers and poet was Langton Hughes. His poem, The Deferred Dream, is an epitome of the struggle of Black Lives. But who was Mr. Hughes?

A Dream Deferred 


by Langston Hughes

 


What happens to a dream deferred? 


Does it dry uplike a raisin in the sun? 

Or fester like a sore--And then run? 

Does it stink like rotten meat? 

Or crust and sugar over--like a syrupy sweet? 


Maybe it just sagslike a heavy load. 


Or does it explode?



 

Hughes' life and work were enormously influential during the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s, alongside those of his contemporaries, Zora Neale Hurston, Wallace Thurman, Claude McKay, Countee Cullen, Richard Bruce Nugent, and Aaron Douglas. Hughes and his fellows tried to depict the "low-life" in their art, that is, the real lives of blacks in the lower social-economic strata. They criticized the divisions and prejudices within the black community based on skin color. His poetry and fiction portrayed the lives of the working-class blacks in America, lives he portrayed as full of struggle, joy, laughter, and music. Permeating his work is pride in the African-American identity and its diverse culture.

Poet, columnist, dramatist, essayist, novelist

His thought united people of African descent and Africa across the globe to encourage pride in their diverse black folk culture and black aesthetic.

Hughes was one of the few prominent black writers to champion racial consciousness as a source of inspiration for black artists. In 1930, his first novel, Not Without Laughter, won the Harmon Gold Medal for literature. At a time before widespread arts grants, Hughes gained the support of private patrons and he was supported for two years prior to publishing this novel. The protagonist of the story is a boy named Sandy, whose family must deal with a variety of struggles due to their race and class, in addition to relating to one another.

Hughes' first collection of short stories was published in 1934 with The Ways of White Folks. He finished the book at a Carmel, California cottage provided for a year by Noel Sullivan, another patron. These stories are a series of vignettes revealing the humorous and tragic interactions between whites and blacks. Overall, they are marked by a general pessimism about race relations, as well as a sardonic realism.

Hughes received numerous scholarships, awards and honorary degrees, for instance: the Anisfield-Wolf Award (1953) for his book on improving race relations.

From the mid-1950s to the mid-1960s, Hughes' popularity among the younger generation of black writers varied even as his reputation increased worldwide. With the gradual advance toward racial integration, many black writers considered his writings of black pride and its corresponding subject matter out of date. He found some new writers, among them James Baldwin, lacking in such pride, over-intellectual in their work, and occasionally vulgar.

Hughes wanted young black writers to be objective about their race, but not to scorn it or flee it. He understood the main points of the Black Power movement of the 1960s, but believed that some of the younger black writers who supported it were too angry in their work. Hughes's work Panther and the Lash, posthumously published in 1967, was intended to show solidarity with these writers, but with more skill and devoid of the most virulent anger and racial chauvinism some showed toward whites. Hughes continued to have admirers among the larger younger generation of black writers. He often helped writers by offering advice and introducing them to other influential persons in the literature and publishing communities. This latter group, including Alice Walker, whom Hughes discovered, looked upon Hughes as a hero and an example to be emulated within their own work

The majority of Langston Hughes poems were written as a free verse and contain recognizable pictures from life. Rhythmics of his verses are related to contemporary music – rhythms of a ballad or blues.

In the 1950’s Hughes was accused of being a Communist by many on the political right, but he always denied it. When asked why he never joined the Communist Party, he wrote, "it was based on strict discipline and the acceptance of directives that I, as a writer, did not wish to accept." In 1953, he was called before the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations led by Senator Joseph McCarthy. He stated, "I never read the theoretical books of socialism or communism or the Democratic or Republican parties for that matter, and so my interest in whatever may be considered political has been non-theoretical, non-sectarian, and largely emotional and born out of my own need to find some way of thinking about this whole problem of myself." Following his testimony, Hughes moved away from overtly political poems and towards more lyric subjects. When selecting his poetry for his Selected Poems (1959) he excluded all his radical socialist verse from the 1930s.

Some of the books and authors 

mentioned in this article

Not Without Laughter
$10.99
The Color Purple
$7.99

 



“Hold fast to your dreams, 

for without them 

life is a broken winged bird 

that cannot fly.” 


– Montage of a Dream Deferred, 1951

 



Silent No More Tshirt
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